This Foal Was Too Scared To Jump The Ridge – But Then His Mother Stepped In

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Part of the reasoning behind this assumption is formed by the fact that horses mostly deliver at night. Nevertheless, hormonal change in the mom does not end after her foal is delivered. Indeed, chemically based behavioral cues coupled with sights and smells dictate her demeanor towards her newborn going forward.

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When the foal emerges, it is covered in fluids from mommy, and this draws her to the baby. It is in these initial moments when the special bond between parent and child is first formed. Furthermore, the mare’s actions towards the birth fluids actually helps shape the development of her newborn.

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Mother mare, lured in by the scent of the fluids, frequently nudges and nibbles at her baby. Mom’s constant attention is thought to come as a source of great annoyance to the newborn. Her bothersome behavior encourages the foal to first stand and then attempt to escape the unwelcome sensation.

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